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  • APC Shaping Internet Governance Processes At KeIGF
    by Sid Chudasama on October 27, 2020 at 7:59 am

    Internet governance, and especially the protection of privacy and other human rights, is an important point for civil society activists and non-governmental organisations. For academia and innovators worldwide, Internet governance must make sure that the internet does not close its doors open for development and innovation. Brilliant minds of tomorrow’s Gumzo, Kytabu, and Dawati are out there, somewhere, browsing the net. Their innovativeness should not be stifled; rather they should be encouraged to develop new, more creative ways to use the Internet. The way the Internet is defined reflects different perspectives, approaches, and policy interests in Kenya. The differing perspectives and policy interests is a main factor as to why the Kenya Internet Governance forum exists. (KeIGF) The relevance of Internet governance has slowly moved closer sustainable economic and social development. The KeIGF will host the Kenyan cyber spaces most important players so as to discuss Internet governance issues on an equal footing through an open and inclusive process. The event will unfold virtually on the 29th of October. The participants will consist of 200 individuals representing various sectors including government, the private sector, civil society, the technical and academic community, and the general public. Also, the event will feature the participation of young people who will attend the Youth IGF. The main outcome of the Kenya IGF is to maximise opportunities for open and inclusive dialogue and the exchange of ideas on Internet Governance (IG) related issues. Others include the creation of opportunities to share best practices and experiences; the identification of emerging issues and bringing them to the attention of the relevant bodies and the general public; and contribution to capacity building for Internet governance. Further, the Kenya IGF will feature an award ceremony for the participants of the 5th edition of the Kenya School of Internet Governance (KESIG) which shall be held on 27th and 28th October 2020. The School is an initiative of KICTAnet and other partners, to promote awareness and knowledge of stakeholders in Kenya to enable them to contribute actively to Internet Governance. Formed in 2005, KICTANet is a multi-stakeholder network of members from civil society groups, private sector, development partners, technical community and media. The network aims to act as a catalyst for reform in the ICT sector in support of the government mission to enable Kenyans to gain maximum benefit from the opportunity offered by ICTs. They have been involved in organising the Kenya IGF in partnership with industry stakeholders to address key Internet issues since 2008. KICTANet were acknowledged worldwide as a great model for Public-Private Partnership (PPP) and Multistakeholder engagement. Plus, they also played an instrumental role in the data protection bill. With regards to their collaboration to convene the KeIGF, “We ensure that we relentlessly discuss any new issues related to ICT policy, while at the same time continue to advocate for old issues until they are resolved.” Averred Mr. Ali Hussein, Chairman at KICTANet. “Government policy formulation is a slow process. Small wins in policy formulations are better than stagnation. We cannot all get what we want, but small systematic changes are also progress we appreciate.” added Hussein. As far as policy goes, the KeIGF will be held in an informal setting, free from binding negotiations, and it will create a unique platform for all stakeholders to openly exchange perspectives and concerns on key issues that may affect the future of the Internet for millions of Kenyans. Association for Progressive Communications (APC) is one such organisation that has taken the reins to influencing internet governance processes. They are an international network of civil society organisations, founded in 1990 dedicated to empowering and supporting people working for peace, human rights, development and protection of the environment, through the strategic use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). They work to build a world in which all people have easy, equal and affordable access to the creative potential of ICTs to improve their lives and create more democratic and egalitarian societies. APC’s strength lies in the fact that they do not get excited about the internet for the internet’s sake. They get excited because they are committed activists who want to use it to make the world a better place. KICTANet collaborated with APC to make this annual event a success, and to help establish dialogue to shape the internet and digital technologies to create a just and sustainable world, leading to greater care for ourselves, each other and the earth.   The post APC Shaping Internet Governance Processes At KeIGF appeared first on CIO East Africa.

  • Enabling Next-Generation Data Centres Through The Effective Management Of Power Supply
    by Staff Writer on October 27, 2020 at 6:29 am

    Demand for data centres has surged as digital transformation projects continue to add innovative new technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), cloud computing, big data, analytics, 5G, and Wi-Fi 6 connectivity, into the daily processes of organisations. A Research and Markets study found that data centre support infrastructure is expected to expand by $38.1 billion, at a CAGR of 9.4%, by 2025. For a mature technology like data centres, that rate of growth is incredible. Such investment is needed because these advanced technologies all require massive compute power. AI, for example, increases computing capacity through the use of intelligent applications, which trigger more data traffic. Furthermore, technologies such as AI and Internet of Things (IoT) are driving data centres towards full-lifecycle digitalisation in how they are planned, constructed, and optimised. For that transition to be successful, data centres need to be more intelligent and digitally managed. In short, the strain that these technologies are putting on the evolution of data centres is significant. These new applications are also driving a change to how data centres are being physically built and utilised. Where data centres were traditionally support platforms, they’re now being built faster. The establishment cycle has been condensed to less than six months, where previously it would take a year. These shorter timelines have arisen due to modularisation whereby data centres are built in modules on the level of architecture. This enables fast deployment while also allowing organisations to future-proof their data centres by enabling flexible capacity expansion, simple management, and high-energy efficiency. What makes a great data centre? To capitalise on opportunities that these new-look and newly refocused data centres offer, enterprises need their data centres to be more reliable, efficient, and simple. A reliable power supply architecture is essential, too, as enterprises now rely entirely on the availability of technology to avoid any downtime that could shut the entire business down. Research and Markets research shows that power supply can grow at more than 8.9% over time — such a growth rate is substantial enough that businesses need to be actively cognisant of power needs in an ever-changing market. Looking at the numbers, data centre facilities will be far denser and more compact, with power capacity expected to jump from six to eight kW on average to 15-20kW per rack by 2025. It’s not just that data centres need to be able to handle an escalation in power requirements, either. A simplified power supply architecture is also needed to allow data centres to minimise their footprint. This can be achieved through good design, along with evaluations and optimisations of energy facilities and the full stack across facilities, IT, chipsets, data, and the cloud. At each stage, there is an opportunity for optimisation and efficiency, and that not only drives an environmentally-friendly data centre, but also makes it easier to manage the power supply and track down faults. All of this means that while uninterruptible power supply (UPS) units with lead-acid batteries continue to be a common feature in many data centres, UPS units are simply incapable of providing the performance required in next-generation data centre facilities. To meet this demand, organisations are grappling with new demands placed on data centres and will need to look at lithium-ion batteries for their size, footprint, charge cycles, and general capabilities as a solution. This should be in combination with a coordinated power supply mode so that if the power grid becomes unstable or is struggling to deliver capacity during peak hours, the lithium-ion battery is still able to provide a coordinated power supply to ensure disruptions are prevented. This will allow data centres — if paired with intelligent management processes — to fit perfectly within the cycle of peak-valley electricity prices and help organisations save on costs. The SmartLi difference Huawei’s SmartLi UPS solution has been designed to address the changing demands of data centres on power supplies. The solution includes a high power density modular UPS and high energy density lithium battery solution that streamlines the workflow through the data centre. The high power density will also help save 50% of footprints when compared to traditional power supplies, and the intelligent control can maintain stable power supply to ensure the data centre facility is always on. As an additional benefit, the SmartLi UPS solution applies a unique active current-sharing technology that supports the mixed use of old and new supplies, which is particularly useful for enterprises that are looking to make the shift from lead-iron to lithium-ion batteries. The technology that Huawei has packed into its SmartLi UPS solution means that it has a longer lifespan compared to units from competitors. Boasting a cycle life of 5,000 times at 50% DOD, this means that a business won’t need to replace their unit for 10 years, reducing the TCO and allowing small and medium-sized businesses to find financial advantages through investing in their systems.   The post Enabling Next-Generation Data Centres Through The Effective Management Of Power Supply appeared first on CIO East Africa.

  • KeNIC’s Crucial Role As Sponsor In KeIGF 2020
    by Aaliyah Bashir on October 26, 2020 at 8:02 pm

    The Internet has ferried the world through the pandemic in numerous ways. It allowed the space for continuance when the world was grabbed by the shoulders and vigorously wrung by COVID-19. In this strange entanglement, the Internet has played a somewhat extraordinary role. The Kenya Internet Governance Forum (KeIGF) will serve as an expansive tool in exploring this further, amongst various issues in regard to policy dialogue. The Kenya Network Information Centre (KeNIC) has adopted the crucial role as a sponsor for the Kenya Internet Governance Forum 2020, to be held in three days on 29 October. As a key role player in the ICT ecosystem, KeNIC is also in partnership with KICTANet. KeIGF is a unique platform for various stakeholders to have an open dialogue and exchange on policy issues around the topic of Internet governance, especially in relation to the pandemic. They explore the key concerns that may affect the future of the Internet for millions of Kenyans in numerous ways. It is a cooperative engagement of multi-stakeholders who discuss Internet governance as one of the key features for the Internet’s success. The IGF has been held annually since 2006 and Kenya hosted the Global IGF in 2011. “In 2020, the IGF will approach network resilience specifically from a people-centred perspective, exploring how it has supported the human resilience and solidarity needed to respond to the many challenges posed by the pandemic’” says Ali Hussein, Chairman of KICTANet. The Kenya ICT Action Network (KICTANet) is a multi-stakeholder platform for people and institutions interested and involved in ICT policy and regulation. The network aims to act as a catalyst for reform in the ICT sector in support of the national aim of ICT enabled growth and development. The proposed theme for the KeIGF is ‘Internet for human resilience and solidarity’. Within the folds of it, are envisioned sub-themes: trust, data and inclusion. Trust is a must, in the online world. For the Internet to flourish successfully, it must be as inseparable from trust, as fire is to smoke. This entanglement can be a prospective tool for empowerment, free speech and the drive for economic development. For a healthy and safe digital environment, security, stability and resilience are the way forward to building trust within the digital community. The forum will provide opportunities to discuss and dissect strategies and the best practices for protecting both systems and users, along with appropriate roles and responsibilities of the government. Additionally, this facet will tackle the consideration of the relationship between security and users’ fundamental freedoms and rights and understanding responses needed to the growing range of threats to the global Internet and Internet users of all age groups. Inclusion encompasses equal opportunity and involvement of marginalized groups, that have limited or no access to the Internet and those for which the Internet is not accessible due to disability, digital literacy, affordability, gender and any other reason, to be meaningfully connected to the internet. It’s also about activities related to the accomplishment of an inclusive information society, about engaging all stakeholders and overseeing that everyone has fair and equal say and is treated uniformly in decision-making processes and ensuring that everyone has the right access, skills, and motivations to reap the social advantages of participating in the digital economy. The data track will discuss the challenges in regard to ensuring the benefits of the data revolution to contribute to the wellbeing of economic development while also protecting the rights of the people. It will allow a diversity of views on how to support and operationalize the exercise of human rights and the empowerment of users in the digital profile in current uses and development of data-driven technologies. Similarly, the discussion will surround identifying the best approaches to ensure the development of human-centric data governance frameworks at national, regional and international levels. The participants of the virtual forum will include hundreds of individuals from a coalescence of contributors and conversationalists from various sectors including the government, the private sector, civil society, the technical and academic community and the general public. KeNIC is a domain registry that was developed in 1993 with the aim of creating a nonprofit organization to oversee and operate the ‘.ke’ and ‘ccTLDs’. It also looks at the development of internet-related services in Kenya, through various national and international organizations through Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs). With the aid of the government, KeNIC hopes to ensure equal standards in regard to Kenya being on par with global internet technologies. “As a fully voluntary organization, one of the critical issues we always face is funding. We have managed to surmount these challenges by vigorously fundraising which significantly helps us to execute our mandate'” Ali remarks. As a sponsor, KeNIC is seeking to offer support and partnership of the forum and largely of the informative mission and advantageous outcomes that will spawn from it. Thus, they play a crucial role in contributing to the success of the event and ensuring it leads on swimmingly.           The post KeNIC’s Crucial Role As Sponsor In KeIGF 2020 appeared first on CIO East Africa.

  • Facebook Joins Forces With KICTANet For KeGIF 2020
    by Aaliyah Bashir on October 26, 2020 at 4:35 pm

    I can bet that not many can think of the word ‘Internet’ and Facebook doesn’t somehow automatically come to mind. The colossus and front runner certainly has one of the largest user bases in the world. Their mission is to give people the power to build communities and bring the world closer together. So imagine how befitting it is to have them as sponsors of the Kenya Government Internet Forum 2020. Held annually since 2006, The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is a multi-stakeholder event regarding policy dialogue on the issue of Internet governance. Free from binding negotiations, the virtual forum will be held in an informal setting. Like a magnet, it attracts and unites an amalgam of stakeholders from the government, the private sector, the technical community, academia and civil societies, to take part in the discussion concerning Internet governance through an open and inclusive process. It spearheads the vision that the Internet remains sustainable for economic and social development. The platform serves as an informative platter whereby numerous stakeholders come together to connect and openly exchange various perspectives on key concerns, that may influence the lives of millions of Kenyans. Like a virtual round table, every knight or noble person in sitting, both have an equal seat and an equal voice. Speaking of knights, KICTANet has been directly involved in orchestrating the Kenya IGF, with numerous partnerships to address key Internet concerns since 2008. “KICTANet’s guiding philosophy is that of encouraging synergies for ICT policy-related activities and initiatives. Accordingly, the Network provides mechanisms and a framework for continuing cooperation and collaboration in ICT matters among industry, technical community, media, development partners and the Government”, introduces KICTANet’s Chairman, Ali Hussein. Like a virtual round table, every knight or noble person in sitting, both have an equal seat and an equal voice. Speaking of knights, KICTANet has been directly involved in orchestrating the Kenya IGF, with numerous partnerships to address key Internet concerns since 2008. As a body, KICTANet has seen several commendable achievements. The Think Tank contributed to the development of the Kenya ICT policy in 2019, has published countless Policy Briefs on ICT related issues, plays a major role in the Data Protection Bill, works with different stakeholders to defeat the ICT Practitioners’ Bill and is recognized worldwide as a great model for Public-Private Partnership (PPP) and multi-stakeholder engagement. The theme for the Kenya IGF is Internet for Human Resilience and Solidarity. It explores the role that the Internet has been playing since the pandemic. “Resilience of the Internet as an interconnected, interoperable network has been a regular topic at the IGF. In 2020, the IGF will approach network resilience specifically from a people-centred perspective, exploring how it has supported the human resilience and solidarity needed to respond to the many challenges posed by the pandemic,” says KICTANet’s Chairman, Ali Hussein. The sub-themes encompassed within the main topic are; Data, Inclusion and Trust. The Data track will provide for discussions on the fundamental challenge of ensuring the benefits of the data revolution in provision to the inclusive economic development while protecting the rights of the people. The inclusion facet is about ensuring those with limited or no access to the Internet, such as unserved and under-served communities, as well as those who find internet inaccessible because of their gender, disability, digital literacy, afford-ability, or any other reason, are now included and have equal opportunity to connect to the internet. The inclusion facet is about ensuring those with limited or no access to the Internet, such as unserved and under-served communities, as well as those who find internet inaccessible because of their gender, disability, digital literacy, afford-ability, or any other reason. And lastly, the trust aspect incorporates the security, stability and resilience of the infrastructure, systems and devices and also to the need for people to be safe and secure. On all accords, trust is an important factor in success and partnerships both off and online.  It’s imperative to have trust within key collaborations, services and businesses in order to build a sustainable fortress to mature and facilitate economic and social development. The main expectation of the forum is to maximize opportunities for open and inclusive dialogue as well as collaboration and exchange of ideas on Internet Governance. Additionally, expected outcomes also include creation of opportunities to share the best practices and experiences, the recognition of emerging issues and relaying them to relevant bodies and the general public and lastly, contribution to capacity building for Internet governance. Facebook, as a leading champion in the global arena, has joined forces to sponsor KeIGF 2020. The app has over 2.7 billion monthly active users, created millions of jobs both directly and indirectly as a marketing tool and platform for a plethora of companies and independent stores, to conduct their business online. With it’s easy to use and engaging features, constant updates, worldwide consumers and robust level of user engagement, its strikingly suitable to be able to sponsor the KeIGF, and support the theme of resilience and solidarity in the online world. Facebook has been a Grade A facet in facilitating and bringing together online communities from all over the globe. If handled appropriately, Internet governance can be the avenue to ensure a safe, engaging and open experience to all users, especially to the benefit of social and economic developments and widely across all communities but it cannot be done in solitude but rather in solidarity.     The post Facebook Joins Forces With KICTANet For KeGIF 2020 appeared first on CIO East Africa.

  • 4 Characteristics of a Li-ion
    by Sid Chudasama on October 26, 2020 at 3:49 am

    Lithium-ion batteries consisting of LiCoO2 and graphite are popular worldwide as power sources for your favourite electronics. Graphite and LiCoO2 are called lithium insertion materials. In other words, the lithium-ion battery consists of two lithium insertion materials. Attempts to develop rechargeable lithium batteries in the early years were unsuccessful due to safety problems. Due to the inherent instability of lithium metal, especially during charging, research shifted to a non-metallic lithium battery using lithium ions. Slightly lower in energy density than lithium metal, lithium-ion is safe, provided certain precautions are met when charging and discharging. In 1991, the Sony Corporation commercialized the first lithium-ion battery. Other manufacturers followed suit. The combination of two lithium insertion materials is essential for the basic function of the lithium-ion battery. A plus point of the lithium-ion battery concept is that the operating voltage of the battery can be designed by the choice of insertion reaction in terms of operating voltage and its charge–discharge profile. The batteries are one of the most popular types of rechargeable battery for portable electronics, with one of the best energy-to-weight ratios, high open circuit voltage, low self-discharge rate, no memory effect and a slow loss of charge when not in use.   The post 4 Characteristics of a Li-ion appeared first on CIO East Africa.

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